Queer Virtual

cloudnoise:

y’all find me on Original Plumbing’s new site, in the #nonbinary trans* section! This is my first piece, “Which Body,” kind of a gendercarry line of flight.

This is such a fabulous, excited out my skin! Thanks to khahar-joonam Kibele for pulling me for this!

Lemme know ya thoughts!!

"Mediated coven" "virtual seance" THESE BABBIES AND ME
If you live even remotely close to downtown manhattan you literally HAVE to come to this
COME

theaesthlete:

the internet is so important for me because white ppl act like racism isn’t real and my experiences are illegitimate and i’m already an obssessive person w/ proclivity toward rumination so i  can’t handle white ppl acting like racism doesn’t exist

like thank you livejournal + tumblr 

jrvmajesty:

Whatever is next, it all comes back to the idea of a conversation, between innovators and newcomers, between queer audiences and straight ones. “‘Alternative gays’ are a tiny part of the population, so if that’s going to be your whole market, good luck. Why don’t you start the conversation with the heterosexual masses?” he suggests. “I’ve never been into gay separatism or anything like that. What I define as my queer scene is a combination of transgendered folks in both directions, guys, girls, straight people, whatever: it’s more about that dialogue, that’s what gets us off.” - 
“GET TO KNOW IT, AND YOU WON’T WANT TO RIP IT OFF.” FADE TO MIND’S RIZZLA ON HUMANIZING THE EXOTIC

jrvmajesty:

Whatever is next, it all comes back to the idea of a conversation, between innovators and newcomers, between queer audiences and straight ones. “‘Alternative gays’ are a tiny part of the population, so if that’s going to be your whole market, good luck. Why don’t you start the conversation with the heterosexual masses?” he suggests. “I’ve never been into gay separatism or anything like that. What I define as my queer scene is a combination of transgendered folks in both directions, guys, girls, straight people, whatever: it’s more about that dialogue, that’s what gets us off.”

“GET TO KNOW IT, AND YOU WON’T WANT TO RIP IT OFF.” FADE TO MIND’S RIZZLA ON HUMANIZING THE EXOTIC

In broad strokes, we may note that key elements of the good academic life for (aspiring) politically-engaged/minority discourse practitioners includes the belief that knowledge work is related to and can transform the world at large. So clearly and so long has education participated in social…
J.A.I.L (Juggalos Against Illuminati Leadership)
In the psychic moving stream of Tumblr, teen girls build and perform their individual aesthetics, which are not anonymous, even if individual images are not interacted with in the same reverent (or highly art-critical) way with which one might encounter a Monet in a museum. The teen-girl Tumblr aesthetic is less about an individual image that might be dissected and praised or excellence in a specific medium, and more about “articulating a point of view.”

The Teen-Girl Tumblr Aesthetic by Alicia Eler and Kate Durbin (March 1, 2013)

TRIGGER WARNING article discussions of death, violence against women, online harrasment, aaaand quotes lena dunham for no particular reason.

I found this article equal parts baffling, super important and way too intense. It took me three tries to make it to the end, and I can’t get past the fact that they used the death of a young woman as the declencheur for this conversation.

I also wonder how distorted my own visions of these topics are since I’ve only been using Tumblr since the age of 22. Not to mention how sick I am of people lauding/touting Molly Soda as representative of this so-called “Teen-Girl Tumblr Aesthetic.” “Tumblr-famous tEEN GuRL?” She’s 23. Bitch was on livejournal just like the rest of us, never used Tumblr as a diary or a tumblelog in the traditional sense, but as a hyper-parodic art school experiment exploring notions of girlhood. The more people talk about her, the more people talk about her and convince themselves she is some sort of elected representative of every teen girl on tumblr ever? When in fact, she’s mostly mocking it? Snore.

Also, very curious about the absolute absence of discussions around race in this piece… the central figure, but all the the images and examples are very much centered around whiteness and white privilege. There have been countless important discussions challenging the way white young women in these online spaces react in knee-jerk ways to being challenged on these notions, and how many POC resist those dominant scripts by creating and sharing their own images, giving voice to “girls like them” in a way that hadn’t been nearly as accessible/widespread a few short years ago.

I’ve got lots of feelings.

(via garconniere)

I think this can be related to a lot of factors: the trend of nineties nostalgia and the millennial days of the internet, privilege in white femininity, and class issues.

Regarding the nineties trend, this too shall pass. I feel that many teens coming up are just reacting to the current trends of the 2000s looking towards past eras for inspiration, rather than creating their own shit. We see it with music, fashion, and the like. We have a large need to consume, and when are needs aren’t being met with our current times, we look towards the past for something “fresh.” A lot of youth (we’ll say after 1995) were not here for livejournal, and so tumblr is this new medium that they feel is freshness and unique.

As many Westerners, Americans especially shriek at discussions of race due to historical illiteracy. We have been encouraged to see any discussion of racism as “sowing the seeds” of racism. As in France, re: race “it does not exist if one doesn’t speak of it.” Additionally, racism is equated to extreme acts of violence or intimidation akin to Klan and Neo-Nazi actions, so no suburban white girl is even going to entertain the fact that she may have done something wrong, because she does not burn crosses on anyone’s lawn. Another facet is that for many Americans, we have been inculcated, through attacks on affirmative action/visibility of successful people of color, water-downed history classes, and code-speaking politicians, into post-racialism: because we have these people in power who are people of color, racism most be at an all-time low; in fact, it might be “wise” to conclude that white people can be discriminated against as everyone is on an equal-playing field. So when you confront white ladies, who do not understand that they’re femininity or gender performances are privileged, about racism, lack of women of color in their photoshoots or tokens in them, or cultural appropriation, they shriek because it is repulsive to be accused of racism where they live in a world that frequently reinforces their innocence of those things, and actually encourages them to take up victim-hood when people of color confront them.

If you live in a bubble where everything and everyone is sugarcoated to you, where you are able to live in innocence due to your parents’ stability, your race, and your heteronormativity, you will at some point get bored because your entire existence is normative. And you will shriek when others try to critique it because you fear that your “unique” space is trying to return you to normalcy.

(via plastickitten)

CFP: Queer Feminist Hip Hop Scholarship

“All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship”

A Special Issue of Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory.

Issue Guest Editors: Shanté Paradigm Smalls (University of New Mexico) and Jessica N. Pabón (New York University)

Submission deadline: May 1, 2013
Women and Performance invites submissions for a special issue, “All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship.” The editors welcome scholarly articles and performative texts that foreground feminist and queer performance studies approaches to hip hop culture, consumption, and production.
Contemporary rap music, as a stand-in for hip hop culture and production, is virtually synonymous with misogyny and homophobia in the mainstream US and academic imaginary. We want to explore the range of understandings and theories that inform how women and queers experience hip hop culture and performance; this issue underscores the multiplicity of hip hop culture and rejects a myopic totalizing view of what “the culture” does and is. We seek to engage with the wide range of hip hop scholars and practitioners working at the intersections of various methodologies not always associated with scholarly considerations of hip hop (including psychoanalysis, feminist and queer theory, and performance theory), as well as methods typical to hip hop studies—sociology, Black studies, literature, history, musicology, and urban studies. An emerging class of hip hop scholars pressure the givens of race, gender, performance, sexuality, region, nationality, artistry, and iconography—as a culture that has been in a state of constant development for the past forty years, hip hop scholarship is more than due for a queer feminist remixing and reimagining.
As coeditors, we challenge the readers of Women & Performance to ask: What would a specifically queer feminist performance studies approach to hip hop’s culture and production generate in terms of scholarship? How does a queer feminist experience and critique revise hip hop studies? Why has performance studies had so little to say about hip hop, what interventions does performance studies yield? The issue’s focus on producing knowledge about hip hop culture that centralizes women, girls and queer people will include a range of elements, both popular and subcultural: DJ culture, dance, graffiti, human beat boxing, rap music, as well as fashion, media and print, organizing, and other forms of knowledge production. No matter the genre, hip hop is often conceived and misrepresented as a male-dominated culture which casts women and girls as an addendum to hip hop rather than as primary producers, critics, and consumers. Within the pages of this issue, contributors revisit the centrality of feminist and queer artists to the production of all elements of hip hop culture and of feminist and queer critique to hip hop scholarship. “All Hail the Queenz” intends to tease out the nuanced negotiations women, girls, and queer people develop as hip hop artists, critics, and consumers participating within this climate.
Through re-centering feminist and queer critiques and female and queer performance, “All Hail the Queenz” recalibrates hip hop’s center. By recalibrating the center, contributors to this issue refashion hip hop historiography and hip hop aesthetics beyond the art of rapping by the cisgendered male body. In a kind of textual reperformance, this issue takes its title from Queen Latifah’s lyrical demands for respect on her first womanist rap classic album, “All Hail the Queen,” and reminds readers once again that “stereotypes, they got to go!”
Potential Topics:
· Alternate Hip Hop historiographies
· Artist Scholars
· DJing, technology, gender, sexuality
· Feminist, queer, trans* aesthetics
· Feminist, queer, trans* pedagogy
· Graffiti and gender/sexuality
· Hip Hop culture and dis/ability
· Hip Hop diasporas
· Hip Hop fashion
· Hip Hop feminism
· Hip Hop festivals
· Hip Hop’s hybridity
· Human Beatboxing
· Media culture and social networking
· Nation, Empire, and hip hop
· Queer feminist hip hop critique
· Queerness and/in/of hip hop
· Trans* in/and hip hop
Article submissions should be 6-8,000 words in length and adhere to the current Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), author-date format. Performative texts should be 2-3,000 words and in any style the author chooses (same CMS style as above if using citations). Photo essays are welcome. Questions and abstracts for review are welcome before the final deadline.
Complete essays and texts for consideration must be submitted by 11:59 PM EST, May 1, 2013.
Please send all work to both Shanté Paradigm Smalls and Jessica N. Pabón via email (MSWord attachment): shantesmalls@gmail.com and jnp250@nyu.edu.
Further submission guidelines may be found at: www.womenandperformance.org/submission.html. Women and Performance is a peer reviewed journal published by Routledge, Taylor & Francis.

Thanks for circulating!

Best,

Jessica N. Pabón